Thor #703 Review: A Bloodbath in Asgardia

Posted by January 20, 2018 Comment

Thor #703
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Writer: Jason Aaron, Artist: Russel Dauterman, Color Artist: Matthew Wilson, Letters: VC's Joe Sabino, Cover by: Russel Dauterman and Matthew Wilson, Variant Cover by: Rob Liefeld and Leo Paciarotti, Editor: Wil Moss, Associate Editor: Sarah Brunstad, Executive Editor: Tom Brevoort, Publisher: Marvel Comics, Release Date: Out Now, Price: $3.99

Judgement day is here. The Mangog has arrived in Asgardia, and there is no escape for the gods from his wrath. Heimdall, Fridja, and Cul all put in efforts to halt the monster, but it may all be for naught. All the while, Odin merely sits on his throne.

Meanwhile, Falcon, the Odinson, Doctor Strange, and Roz all come to check in on Jane Foster at the hospital. Her prognosis isn’t good. Strange predicts that, if she were to become Thor one more time, it would likely kill her. Jane has a decision to make; she will either save Asgardia or save herself.

Thor #703 cover by Russel Dauterman and Matthew Wilson
Thor #703 cover by Russel Dauterman and Matthew Wilson

The future of Thor and Jane Foster is decided in this issue. We figure out what will become of her and if she will continue to wield the hammer. I’d rather not spoil the ending, and it is very possible they will renege on this in issues to come.

It is a heartwarming moment to see those who care for Jane most coming to her in her hour of greatest need. The Falcon, the Odinson, Roz, and Doctor Strange all come to see how she is. There could have been a little more emotional weight given to these sense, maybe more uncomfortable silence and desparation shown from the likes of Falcon and Roz. However, these moments do handle themselves well overall.

The Mangog’s rampage is brutal and epic. He tears through Asgardia in a wave of blood and chaos. There will likely be little left for whomever comes to save the gods.

One thing that Jason Aaron has done quite well is justifying the fury of the Mangog. His origin comes from Odin wiping out a race, and, though his actions are brutal, Mangog isn’t entirely in the wrong to resent the gods of Asgard. Cul’s reign has been heartless and cruel. Odin is neglectful and bitter. The gods do little for their subjects across the Nine Realms. While Mangog is undoubtedly a villain, he’s not a bland one.

Thor #703 art by Russel Dauterman and Matthew Wilson
Thor #703 art by Russel Dauterman and Matthew Wilson

Russel Dauterman’s artwork brings the carnage and mayhem to live in a brilliant fashion. The destruction of Asgardia and the withering away of Jane Foster are both shown in unnerving and heartbreaking manners. The Mangog continues to look ferocious and generally awesome. Matthew Wilson’s color work is especially excellent in this comic. The color art is lively, dazzling, and brings an extra bit of life into Thor #703.

“The Death of the Mighty Thor” trudges on with the continued spilling of god-blood and the failing health of a hero. It balances the drama and action mostly quite well. This is a powerful tale from Aaron, Dauterman, and Wilson, and it definitely earns itself a recommendation. Give it a read.

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(Last Updated January 20, 2018 5:22 pm )

About Joshua Davison

Josh is a longtime super hero comic fan and an aspiring comic book and fiction writer himself. He also trades in videogames, Star Wars, and Magic: The Gathering, and he is also a budding film buff. He's always been a huge nerd, and he hopes to contribute something of worth to the wider geek culture conversation. He is also happy to announce that he is the new Reviews Editor for Bleeding Cool. Follow on Twitter @joshdavisonbolt.

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