Doctor Strange Damnation #4 Review: Finishes Better than it Started

Doctor Strange Damnation #4 Review: Finishes Better than it Started

Posted by April 25, 2018 Comment

Doctor Strange: Damnation #4
6.5 / 10 Reviewer
{{ reviewsOverall }} / 10 Users (0 votes)
BC Rating
Summary
Writers: Donny Cates and Nick Spencer, Artists: Rod Reis and Szymon Kudranski, Color Artists: Rod Reis and Dan Brown, Letters: VC's Travis Lanham, Cover by: Rod Reis, Variant Covers by: Ron Lim and Rachelle Rosenberg; Greg Smallwood, Designers: Jay Bowen and Anthony Gambino, Assistant Editor: Kathleen Wisneski, Editor: Nick Lowe, Doctor Strange created by Stan Lee and Steve Ditko, Publisher: Marvel Comics, Release Date: Out Today, Price: $4.99

Wong and the Midnight Sons make their final stand against the hordes of Hell and the demonically-possessed Avengers. Before long, Mephisto himself arrives to gloat over having killed Johnny Blaze. However, Mephisto does not know that the Ghost Rider has become the king of Hell, and the tides may soon turn in favor of Wong.

Wong and the Midnight Sons make their final stand against the hordes of Hell and the demonically-possessed Avengers. Before long, Mephisto himself arrives to gloat over having killed Johnny Blaze. However, Mephisto does not know that the Ghost Rider has become the king of Hell, and the tides may soon turn in favor of Wong. Doctor Strange: Damnation ends better than it began. While some of the deliberate lack of repentance on the part of Stephen Strange and the lack of focus on the members of the Midnight Sons that aren’t Wong and Strange does bother me, this final installment didn’t really get on my nerves as much as the first. Don’t get me wrong, this issue still has a myriad of problems that keep it from being required reading. This story was stretched to breaking point, and a good portion of what matters happened in the Ghost Rider issue. This book is a protracted third act. As far as plot-relevance goes, Blade, Doctor Voodoo, Bloodstone, Man-Thing, Scarlet Spider, Moon Knight, and Iron Fist may as well not be here. Even in their own tie-ins, Iron Fist and Scarlet Spider don’t really do anything important to the story. The follow-up story promises more with the Midnight Sons though, and that will hopefully come to something. Rod Reis’ artwork is a welcome presence in this book. His style lends itself to the ethereal and surreal nature of this setting and plot. The color gradience adds a unique atmosphere and generally looks quite good. Szymon Kudranski and Dan Brown handle the epilogue with the Midnight Sons and Doc Strange. The more realistic aesthetic does contrast Reis’ work in an odd manner, but it looks good too. Doctor Strange: Damnation #4 is a decent enough read. If you liked the rest of the story, you’ll like this one too. The fact that the story at least acknowledges that Strange’s idea was terrible from the start and ties it to personal problems helps a lot. Reis, Kudranksi, and Brown provide good visuals. Feel free to check it out.
Doctor Strange: Damnation #4 cover by Rod Reis

Doctor Strange: Damnation ends better than it began. While some of the deliberate lack of repentance on the part of Stephen Strange and the lack of focus on the members of the Midnight Sons that aren’t Wong and Strange does bother me, this final installment didn’t really get on my nerves as much as the first.

Don’t get me wrong, this issue still has a myriad of problems that keep it from being required reading. This story was stretched to breaking point, and a good portion of what matters happened in the Ghost Rider issue. This book is a protracted third act. As far as plot-relevance goes, Blade, Doctor Voodoo, Bloodstone, Man-Thing, Scarlet Spider, Moon Knight, and Iron Fist may as well not be here. Even in their own tie-ins, Iron Fist and Scarlet Spider don’t really do anything important to the story.

The follow-up story promises more with the Midnight Sons though, and that will hopefully come to something.

Wong and the Midnight Sons make their final stand against the hordes of Hell and the demonically-possessed Avengers. Before long, Mephisto himself arrives to gloat over having killed Johnny Blaze. However, Mephisto does not know that the Ghost Rider has become the king of Hell, and the tides may soon turn in favor of Wong. 	Doctor Strange: Damnation ends better than it began. While some of the deliberate lack of repentance on the part of Stephen Strange and the lack of focus on the members of the Midnight Sons that aren’t Wong and Strange does bother me, this final installment didn’t really get on my nerves as much as the first.  	Don’t get me wrong, this issue still has a myriad of problems that keep it from being required reading. This story was stretched to breaking point, and a good portion of what matters happened in the Ghost Rider issue. This book is a protracted third act. As far as plot-relevance goes, Blade, Doctor Voodoo, Bloodstone, Man-Thing, Scarlet Spider, Moon Knight, and Iron Fist may as well not be here. Even in their own tie-ins, Iron Fist and Scarlet Spider don’t really do anything important to the story. 	The follow-up story promises more with the Midnight Sons though, and that will hopefully come to something. 	Rod Reis’ artwork is a welcome presence in this book. His style lends itself to the ethereal and surreal nature of this setting and plot. The color gradience adds a unique atmosphere and generally looks quite good. Szymon Kudranski and Dan Brown handle the epilogue with the Midnight Sons and Doc Strange. The more realistic aesthetic does contrast Reis’ work in an odd manner, but it looks good too. 	Doctor Strange: Damnation #4 is a decent enough read. If you liked the rest of the story, you’ll like this one too. The fact that the story at least acknowledges that Strange’s idea was terrible from the start and ties it to personal problems helps a lot. Reis, Kudranksi, and Brown provide good visuals. Feel free to check it out.
Doctor Strange: Damnation #4 art by Rod Reis

Rod Reis’ artwork is a welcome presence in this book. His style lends itself to the ethereal and surreal nature of this setting and plot. The color gradience adds a unique atmosphere and generally looks quite good. Szymon Kudranski and Dan Brown handle the epilogue with the Midnight Sons and Doc Strange. The more realistic aesthetic does contrast Reis’ work in an odd manner, but it looks good too.

Doctor Strange: Damnation #4 is a decent enough read. If you liked the rest of the story, you’ll like this one too. The fact that the story at least acknowledges that Strange’s idea was terrible from the start and ties it to personal problems helps a lot. Reis, Kudranksi, and Brown provide good visuals. Feel free to check it out.

What people say... Leave your rating
Order by:

Be the first to leave a review.

User Avatar User Avatar
Verified
{{{ review.rating_title }}}
{{{review.rating_comment | nl2br}}}

Show more
{{ pageNumber+1 }}

Leave your rating

sf

(Last Updated April 25, 2018 7:20 pm )

Related Posts

None found

About Joshua Davison

Josh is a longtime super hero comic fan and an aspiring comic book and fiction writer himself. He also trades in videogames, Star Wars, and Magic: The Gathering, and he is also a budding film buff. He's always been a huge nerd, and he hopes to contribute something of worth to the wider geek culture conversation. He is also happy to announce that he is the new Reviews Editor for Bleeding Cool. Follow on Twitter @joshdavisonbolt.

View All Posts