Steve Ditko on Collecting His Mr. A Comics in a Trade Paperback

Posted by March 15, 2018 Comment

90-year-old Steve Ditko has never stopped creating comic books. And he still does, from his New York studio. You can order them from Robin Snyder here, though international distribution can be a bit tricky.

So what about collecting them in a more sizeable volume suitable for bookstores and comic stores, surviving the rigours of international distribution? Collecting his Mr. A comic books, given the interest and demand from all over the place?

Don’t count on it. Written in a card to an inquiring Steve Ditko fan…


I think that makes it clear…

Stephen J. Ditko is best known as the artist and co-creator, with Stan Lee, of Marvel Comics superheroes Spider-Man and Doctor Strange.

Ditko studied under Batman artist Jerry Robinson at the Cartoonist and Illustrators School in New York City. He began his professional career in 1953, working in the studio of Joe Simon and Jack Kirby, beginning as an inker and coming under the influence of artist Mort Meskin. During this time, he then began his long association with Charlton Comics, where he did work in the genres of science fiction, horror, and mystery. He also co-created the superhero Captain Atom in 1960.

During the 1950s, Ditko also drew for Atlas Comics, a forerunner of Marvel Comics. He went on to contribute much significant work to Marvel. In 1966, after being the exclusive artist on The Amazing Spider-Man and the “Doctor Strange” feature in Strange Tales, Ditko left Marvel for reasons never specified.

Ditko continued to work for Charlton and also DC Comics, making major contributions, including a revamp of the long-running character the Blue Beetle, and creating or co-creating the Question, the Creeper, Shade, the Changing Man, and Hawk and Dove. Ditko also began contributing to small independent publishers, where he created Mr. A, a hero reflecting the influence of Ayn Rand’s philosophy of Objectivism. Since the 1960s, Ditko has declined most interviews, stating that it is his work he offers readers, not his personality.

He continues to work, self-publishing comic books from small offices in New York City. In the book, sometimes people pop by…

(Last Updated March 15, 2018 1:31 pm )

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