A Comic Book Only Freemasons Could Afford, with a Cover Price of $13,000

Posted by February 5, 2018 Comment

Seen at Angouleme, “The Testament of the Fool” edition of gnostic graphic novel The Secret Triangle by Didier Convard. Giving new meaning to the word coffee table book, as it could easily be a coffee table in its own right. Originally published by Glenat, this is one of a handful of copies created in this format by Jean-Marc Pinon.

The masonic references in the graphic novel have been integrated into this behemoth of a book. A wooden box including the volumes INRI, Hertz, Lacrima Christi and The Guardians of the Blood in connected leather, a sketchbook made by the five artists on the series and a secret drawer, referencing the freemasonic origins of the comics, containing the rings of the Chevaliers Champenois — each with one of the signs of the Shroud — and the ring that opens the tomb of Christ.

The price is 10,733 Euros, or around $13,000 each, probably the highest cover price for a comic book ever. Nevertheless, five copies have already been sold. Possibly to fellow masons…

The comics were created by Didier Convard, Denis Falque, André Juillard, Christian Gine, Pierre Wachs, Patrick Jusseaume, Jean-Charles Kraehn, Éric Stalner, and Gilles Chaillet.

The Secret Triangle tells the story of Didier Mosèle, freemason, a specialist in the restoration of ancient parchments. One of his Brothers died and, while he is seeking explanations from his mentor Martin Hertz, he confides to him knowledge of a book whose existence challenges the foundations of Catholicism and Christianity: “The Testament of the Fool “, the last testament of Jesus made by thirteenth-century copyist monks at the request of the Knights Templar.

Didier Mozèle will not stop finding the tomb of Jesus Christ. But he is not alone… The Guardians of the Blood, one of the armed branches of the Vatican, will hunt down him and his companions, not hesitating to suppress the annoying witnesses, their goal being to bury definitively this history…

Dark and tortuous, the series lasts through seven volumes. Addressing a delicate religious subject, Convard specifies that “The Secret Triangle is a work of fiction built on the interpretation of some facts that have influenced it,” and asks the reader “to address it only as such.” Convard does not hide his membership as a Freemason. The Secret Triangle was initially the sketch of a novel that Convard presented to Jacques Glénat around a meal. Glenat wanted to read the unfinished project, and then asked him to adapt it to a comic strip. The theme of the story is not unlike that of The Da Vinci Code (although it should be noted that The Secret Triangle was published many years before).

You can find out more about the comic book here.

(Last Updated February 5, 2018 3:12 pm )