Geoff Johns Confirms DC Movies Part Of Schrodinger’s Shared Cinematic Universe

DCEU movies will be both connected and not connected at the same time.

Earlier this week, DC Entertainment President Diane Nelson and Chief Creative Officer Geoff “Jeff” Johns gave an interview to bird-themed pop culture site Vulture declaring that DCEU movies would share a far less rigid continuity. Nelson said:

“Our intention, certainly, moving forward is using the continuity to help make sure nothing is diverging in a way that doesn’t make sense, but there’s no insistence upon an overall story line or interconnectivity in that universe. Moving forward, you’ll see the DC movie universe being a universe, but one that comes from the heart of the filmmaker who’s creating them.”

Then Johns added:

“Some of the movies do connect the characters together, like Justice League. But, like with Aquaman, our goal is not to connect Aquaman to every movie. The movie’s not about another movie.”

However, the report also revealed a “side label” of standalone DC flicks set outside the continuity of the DCEU, beginning with a Joker solo movie written and directed by Todd Phillips. Of course, all of this prompted headlines speculating on the interconnected nature, or lack thereof, of the DCEU.

But on Twitter today, Johns decided to clear things up (for now) by tweeting:

It’s long been theorized by boxofficologists that the DCEU is actually both an interconnected shared universe and a series of separate, completely unrelated films at the same time, with no way to tell which until actually going to a movie theater and watching one. Back in August, The Batman director Matt Reeves clearly said that The Batman would be a “standalone” film that is “not part of the extended universe,” only to contradict those statements a day later by saying, “of course Batman will be part of the DC Universe.”

At press time, no one had the guts to check inside the box and see if Ben Affleck was still breathing.

About Jude Terror

A prophecy says that in the comic book industry's darkest days, a hero will come to lead the people through a plague of overpriced floppies, incentive variant covers, #1 issue reboots, and super-mega-crossover events.

Scourge of Rich Johnston, maker of puns, and seeker of the Snyder Cut, Jude Terror, sadly, is not the hero comics needs right now... but he's the one the industry deserves.