Ubisoft Has Banned Over 1000 For Honor Players For AFK Farming

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There was an easy exploit to For Honor's multiplayer that far too many players took advantage of. You could enter a match, hold a thumbstick down in a direction, and then walk away from the game only to come back and get rewards for taking part in the match. Even though your character was basically DOA.

Ubisoft had previously announced that they would be going after AFK farmers and giving warnings for first offenders, then escalating to 3-day bans, and finally longer bans for repeated offenders.

On Reddit, Ubisoft says they've handed out around 1,500 3-day bans, and around 4,000 warnings to players who've been detected using the exploit so far. Players found using a cheat engine may now be facing a permaban.

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Ubisoft had previously stated on their For Honor blog, "This week we wanted to give your more visibility about our policy against players who are "AFK Farming" the For Honor Battlefields. For those unfamiliar with the practice, players are able to go AFK (away from keyboard) and keep their in-game character moving throughout a match (ex. tying a rubber band on the control stick), garnering end-game rewards and progression without actually playing. The "farming" aspect comes about when these players use this technique frequently to gain a large amount of these rewards.

"Because this kind of behavior negatively affects the player experience of others, it has become a top priority for us. As such, we will be sanctioning all the players who have been found to be using AFK Farming repeatedly."

It looks like the ban hammer has finally made it's appearance and player sanctioning has started. Our earlier coverage of the AFK farming story can be found here.

About Madeline Ricchiuto

Madeline Ricchiuto is a gamer, comics enthusiast, bad horror movie connoisseur, writer and generally sarcastic human. She also really likes cats and is now Head Games Writer at Bleeding Cool.

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