Ant-Man and The Wasp #3 Review: Are You the Ant-God?

Ant-Man and the Wasp #3
7.5 / 10 Reviewer
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Summary
Writer: Mark Waid, Artist: Javier Garron, Color Artist: Israel Silva, Letters: VC's Joe Caramagna, Cover by: David Nakayama, Production Designer: Anthony Gambino, Assistant Editor: Kathleen Wisneski, Editors: Jordan D. White and Nick Lowe, Ant-Man created by Stan Lee, Larry Lieber, and Jack Kirby, Wasp created by Stan Lee, Ernie Hart, and Jack Kirby, Publisher: Marvel Comics, Release Date: Out Now, Price: $3.99

The Unstoppable Wasp is being held without her suit by an alien species in the Microverse. Ant-Man is struggling to free her, but he’s stuck at a size that’s small for even the Microverse. Can an army of super-intelligent Microverse ants and an eccentric alien scientist be the key to saving the day?

Ant-Man and the Wasp #3 cover by David Nakayama
Ant-Man and The Wasp #3 cover by David Nakayama

Ant-Man and The Wasp #3 gets even more goofy than the previous issues, and, despite my probably-assumed-to-be-joyless perception of superhero comics, it really works for me. I found this comic to be quite charming.

Scott Lang remains one of the most delightfully relatable superheroes for inadequate but generally well-meaning nerds like myself. Scott tries so hard to do the right thing. The fact that things generally turn out alright is a little inspiring.

This comic is a pretty good chaser for the Ant-Man and The Wasp film too.

Both the Microverse ants and the scientist, Dalen, provide plenty of laughs throughout the book. Nadia receives a handful of brilliant and generally awesome moments. The story doesn’t go especially far in this comic, but it advances far enough so that the book doesn’t feel like a waste.

Ant-Man and the Wasp #3 art by Javier Garron and Israel Silva
Ant-Man and the Wasp #3 art by Javier Garron and Israel Silva

Javier Garron continues to helm the art on the book, and his work holds up well despite some flaws. It is an anarchic and at-times busy aesthetic, but it has a lot of charming touches like the scruff adorning Scott’s face. The design of the aliens is outright ridiculous, and I love it. The inking is a little too heavy at times, but it’s mostly functional. Israel Silva’s color work is similarly wild and varied, though it could use some brightening given the wild narrative tone and characters.

Ant-Man and The Wasp #3 is another fun if somewhat thin entry in the Mark Waid miniseries. Scott and Nadia get plenty of good moments and lines of dialogue, and the aliens have a lot of charm to offer as well. The art has problems but is mostly appealing. This one earns a recommendation. Check it out.

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About Joshua Davison

Josh is a longtime super hero comic fan and an aspiring comic book and fiction writer himself. He also trades in videogames, Star Wars, and Magic: The Gathering, and he is also a budding film buff. He's always been a huge nerd, and he hopes to contribute something of worth to the wider geek culture conversation. He is also happy to announce that he is the new Reviews Editor for Bleeding Cool. Follow on Twitter @joshdavisonbolt.