Redneck #11 Review: Dark Origins and Great Betrayals

Posted by March 30, 2018 Comment

Redneck #11
8.5 / 10 Reviewer
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Summary
Writer: Donny Cates, Artist: Lisandro Estherren, Color Artist: Dee Cunniffe, Letters: Joe Sabino, Cover by: Nick Pitarra, Associate Editor: Arielle Basich, Editor: Jon Moisan, Redneck created by Donny Cates and Lisandro Estherren, Publisher: Image Comics, Release Date: Out Now, Price: $3.99

Perry frees Bartlett, and the pair escape through the woods. When they get to a hiding spot, Perry demands that Bartlett tells her what she is and how she came into this family. Bartlett reveals the dark story to her.

Redneck #11 cover by Nick Pitarra
Redneck #11 cover by Nick Pitarra

Perry’s origins in Redneck #11 are harrowing indeed, and you get new insight into her relationship with Bowmans. In fact, it makes you wonder who the real “heroes” of this story are.

Most of the story is that origin tale, with the last portion being the direct and violent aftermath. That aftermath is mostly made up of an awesome superpowered action sequence reminiscent of the various times Jean Grey has cut loose in the past.

It’s impressive when a revelation can truly recontextualize a story like this while being believable within the story’s universe. It’s even more impressive that it can make you feel some level of sympathy for the violent white trash vampires who’ve been wrecking shit for the past few issues. Donny Cates pulls of a cheeky maneuver in this issue of Redneck.

You can still sympathize with the Bowmans despite what happened to Perry. However, as I implied above, it makes things far more muddled and gray than they already were. It also foreshadows an epic showdown for next issue (even if Redneck #9 also foreshadowed this to be happening immediately).

Redneck #11 art by Lisandro Estherren and Dee Cunniffe
Redneck #11 art by Lisandro Estherren and Dee Cunniffe

Lisandro Estherren’s artwork is dirty, gritty, and perfectly suited to the story of Redneck. The world is grody and messy, the characters are rough and weathered, and it all suits the southern-gothic-with-vampires premise of this series. The faces can be odd at times, especially around the eyes, but even that works most of the time. Dee Cunniffe’s color art is similarly rough and grimy. The story takes place at night in dark basements and shady woods, which allows the red-dominant finale to stand out even more.

Redneck #11 is a hard-bitten issue of betrayal, lies, and macabre origins. Cates, Estherren, and Cunniffe do some great work here, and it leaves the reader riled for the next issue. This one earns a recommendation. Check it out.

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(Last Updated March 30, 2018 10:14 pm )

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About Joshua Davison

Josh is a longtime super hero comic fan and an aspiring comic book and fiction writer himself. He also trades in videogames, Star Wars, and Magic: The Gathering, and he is also a budding film buff. He's always been a huge nerd, and he hopes to contribute something of worth to the wider geek culture conversation. He is also happy to announce that he is the new Reviews Editor for Bleeding Cool. Follow on Twitter @joshdavisonbolt.

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