Invader Zim #25 Review: Subversive, Delightful, And Full Of Doom

Posted by November 27, 2017 Comment

Invader Zim #25
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Summary
Writer: Eric Trueheart, Artist: Warren Wucinich, Color Artist: Fred C. Stresing, Letters and Recap Page: Warren Wucinich, Cover by: Warren Wucinich, Variant Cover by: Jarrett Williams and Jeremy Lawson, Creator and Control Brain: Jhonen Vasquez, Editor: Robin Herrera, Designer: Keith Wood, Special Thanks: Joan Hilty and Linda Lee, Publisher: Oni Press, Release Date: Out Now, Price: $3.99

Invader Zim finds himself at the mercy of Virooz, a deranged fan of his work who wants Zim to return to his glory at any cost. Virooz has a simple plan for this: he is going to use an Irken Pak to replace Zim’s mind with his own.

All the while, we get to see one of Zim’s first missions as an Irken Invader.

Invader Zim #25 cover by Warren Wucinich
Invader Zim #25 cover by Warren Wucinich

Full disclosure: I adored Invader Zim as a kid. As I grew up, I got more of the subtext and messages of this beautifully dark cartoon. It’s one of those things I loved as a kid that only got better as an adult (the exact inverse of the Star Wars prequels).

I’ve had some limited experience with this comic book series, but I’ve liked what I read. Thankfully, this issue is no different.

This comic is as every bit as funny and subversive as the cartoon while keeping the great subtleties of the animation that gave the show so much personality. The dialogue between Virooz and Zim is funny and a good skewering of how intense fandom culture can become. The flashback to Zim’s first mission shows him to be the earnest yet idiotic villain that he has always been.

Also, the planet in the flashback is called Dooq and has naturally occurring couches.

Eric Trueheart clearly understands Jhonen Vasquez’s glorious creation in Invader Zim, and he continues the story with skill and wit.

Warren Wucinich captures the visual styling of the cartoon, and it maintains the lively and unnerving expressiveness of the show nigh-perfectly. Fred C. Stresing’s colorwork keeps the palette of the old show, mostly focusing on purples, grays, and the occasional neon highlighting. It looks awesome, too.

The Invader Zim comic series has shown how to get a comic adaptation right, though there are actually numerous talented creators doing that same thing alongside this series. In any case, #25 is a funny and engaging read of pure doom. I recommend it strongly, and you should definitely read it.

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(Last Updated November 27, 2017 10:32 am )

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About Joshua Davison

Josh is a longtime super hero comic fan and an aspiring comic book and fiction writer himself. He also trades in videogames, Star Wars, and Magic: The Gathering, and he is also a budding film buff. He's always been a huge nerd, and he hopes to contribute something of worth to the wider geek culture conversation. He is also happy to announce that he is the new Reviews Editor for Bleeding Cool. Follow on Twitter @joshdavisonbolt.

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