Saturday Runaround: The Origin Of The Yellow Ring Batman

Posted by September 11, 2010 Comment

DollWatch: Just in case you might get a sneak peek to the future of Batman books, and what exactly Batman is doing in a Sinestro Corps costume, the packaging of this Mattel doll hides any possible details….

KickAss2Watch: Police are still after that “real-life Catwoman”

SwipeWatch:


HowThingsChangeWatch
: Two years after Frank Frazetta was suing Vanguard Productions and David Spurlock, Vanguard, Spurlock and Dark Horse are co operating over competing publication plans for Frazetta’s White Indian. Dark Horse won’t publish the Frazetta volume of the comic series, leaving Vanguard to take that one on, before continuing with the post-Frazetta issues.

SignWatch: On September 16th, Mike Perkins is signing copies of The Stand at Upper Tampa Bay Regional Public Library, while in London, Pat Mills are Clint Langley are signing ABC Warriors Volgan War at Forbidden Planet.

BC ComicChron

This is The Bleeding Cool ComicChron Robot speaking. I come for your women. But for now I merely collate comic-related bits and pieces online. One day I will rule. Until that day, read on.

Mark Millar directs low-budget film in Glasgow | Film | STV Entertainment

“Whenever you see films made by British film-makers they always seem to be really bleak, whereas New York always looks cool in films. I want to make Glasgow look like that. I live here so I don’t want to make it look rubbish. I want it to look great and the sort of place that people want to come and see.”

Get Well cards for Joe Sinnott

Anyway: If you were in a roomful of comic book folks and you said, “Joe Sinnott was the best inker ever in comics,” I don’t think a lot of breath would be wasted in debating the point. You’d get even less dissent if you said, “Joe Sinnott is the nicest person who was ever in comics.” I might suggest I was more deserving but no one else would. And even I admit that Joe is a great guy.<br />
<br />
That great guy is about to have a hip replacement. The old one’s done worn out and he gets a new one next Friday. If you know Joe, you love him. If you don’t know Joe but you know his work, you love what he does. Either way, you might like to send a get-well card or note to cheer him up and on. That address is…

The Most Serious Comix – TIME

Both the DC and Marvel projects include the characters their business has been built on. It really should come as no surprise, after all, superheroes are what they do. For some this will come across as a gross commodification and trivialization of an awesome, unspeakable tragedy. These characters are arguably more corporate icons than meaningful characters — like seeing Ronald McDonald and the Keebler Elves giving succor to victim’s families. But I think it is more complicated and interesting than that.

Comic Book Authors Go Back to the Drawing Board

Like Barber, Scott McCloud, author of “Reinventing Comics” and the creator of several acclaimed online comic strips, has found a certain psychological solace in simply continuing with his work. On the morning of September 11, he was preparing to post the latest installment of a daily strip called “The Morning Improv” (www.scottmccloud.com), featuring a character that had been killed by a “desert god.” A grief-stricken speech bubble reads: “Stupid, stupid, desert god.” It occurred to McCloud that the phrase could be construed, by some readers, as an inappropriate reference to the terrorists. However, McCloud decided to post the cartoon anyway. “On the larger scale, comic books are trivial,” he says. “But this was my own, tiny act of defiance.”

(Last Updated September 11, 2010 2:31 am )

Related Posts

None found