In-Between Issues Of Revival

Screen shot 2013-03-19 at 7.34.29 PMAlex Wilson writes;

The eighth issue of Revival, written by Tim Seeley and featuring the art of Make Norton, continues to be one of my favorite books coming out of Image. This issue of Revival seems to be the conclusion to a few stories, along with the introduction of a few new ones. It’s a sort of “in-between” issue. May, the town’s investigative reporter finds the celebrity that she has been searching for and Dana confronts Martha’s college professor.

The big cliffhanger of the last issue of Revival was the body parts of people thrown about the highway after the crash is resolved but, to warn you, it isn’t spectacular. The resolution feels almost like it was brushed off after being such a large deal as to conclude the last issue. The resolution is there, don’t misunderstand, but it’s handled casually.

We also see a lot of our characters’ pasts creeping back into the picture, along with new revelations. Like I said before, it feels like a transition issue, connecting the previous stories that have wrapped up and the stories that are beginning the next arc.

We do, however, still see that ghost like baby crying in the woods for one panel. You may remember the ghost baby from previous issues. It’s while and looks like the ghost creature that possessed Martha for a moment, allowing Martha to see its past, which consisted of the ghost going to war and loosing his love. The ghost disappeared as it (I guess he) chased a ring that Martha accidently dropped into a lake. The ghosts are an interesting touch to the story. I find myself wondering if they are what revivers decay into to, a sort of second stage maybe.

This issue isn’t as action packed as the issues before, focusing more on the characters than the story itself. In most previous issues we’ve seen our character deal with the fallout of revivers and what they brought upon their small Wisconsin town but this issue seems to have reached a point where the commotion has called down and now our characters seem to be settling back into their lives, trying to find normalcy, but revivers creep back into this issue, mostly near the end.

I find it difficult to talk about the art in a book this far into the series. Norton has does a fantastic job never letting the reader lose what’s happening and progressing the story through the art. He throws his own flair into the series, making scenes and panels creepy and eerie. Seeley’s words obviously convey the story but Norton’s art is what really makes this a horror book, giving a visual life to Seeley’s ideas.

If you aren’t reading Revival, you should be. It is, in my opinion, one of the best comic books coming out of the industry currently, blending supernatural elements with small town life. In a comic book world full of larger than life cities and characters, it’s nice to step back and look into the dealings of a small Wisconsin town going through a crisis of paranormal proportions.

My one fear with this book is that it might expand too much, taking in too many supernatural elements in an attempt to keep things fresh. I love the idea of the supernatural premise but still a human story.

 

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