Kieron Gillen’s Fridge Of Anger

This is what Kieron Gillen’s World War 2 superhero comic Uber for Avatar looked like in 2008.

On a fridge. The issue being laid out here will be published in April. Kieron Gillen talks about it more here.

As I said, I’ve tried to purge the majority of the tropes of the genre. This is a book that, if you run with its assumptions, takes itself seriously. It’s a book that is more concerned with large scale strategy and economic production. Technological advancement and R&D is key. The heroism tends to be desperate and futile. A tradition of the genre is that a weaker hero will overcome a stronger one. There’s none of that here, any more than a tank is anything but a target when a gunship pops over the horizon. It switches between those decisions between men poring over maps and the lives they’re ending as they push pieces around the board. As the size of the bible suggests, the world building is considerable and the plan is complete. I could end the series at any point by going into a documentary-style comic. While the title shows that the Wunderwaffen of the Germans precipitate the situation, this uses all the major players and all the major theatres. So far I’ve written everyone from Churchill to Hitler, from Guderian to Turing. Its scope is large, to say the least.

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