Monday Runaround – Gay Marriage, Perfume And Newt Gingrich

KevinWatch: Everyone’s talking Archie! The Daily Mail, Huffington, Tim, Fox News… it’s going to get busy!

MooreWatch: Alan Moore on sexism in comics in the eighties.

Miss Arrowette would reduce gangs of criminals to spluttering, coughing helplessness by engulfing them in clouds of talc from her ‘Powder-Puff Arrow’. Batgirl would dazzle villains by reflecting the sun’s rays from the mirror contained in her Bat-Compact. Supergirl, a being of strength approximate to that of Superman himself and thus able to push planets out of orbit without working up a sweat, would spend her time either frolicking with Supercat or Superhorse, or maybe falling in love with the young men from the bottle city of Kandor who would always turn out to be villains who wanted to use her in order to revenge themselves of Superman.

 

AxeWatch: A “graphic novel” launches from Axe perfume and Arcana Comics tomorrow.

CookeWatch: A look ahead at the next Parker volume from IDW and Darwyn Cooke.

AmericaWatch: The Kyoto International Manga Museum in Japan has a new exhibition, Manga Style: North America, looking at how certain comic creators used manga stylings – Felipe Smith, Svetlana Chmakova and Takeshi Miyazawa. The exhibition runs until early February.

SagaWatch: Bryan K Vaughan talks (very little) to USA Today about his new comic with Fiona Staples, Saga.

You’ll get a nice mixture of some bounty hunters, monsters and all sorts of lovely threats.

FictionWatch: Lee Budgie Barnett starts a new Fast Fiction challenge on Whitechapel.

AndBeDamnedWatch: The harsh realities of self publishing comic books.

The thing was that it was measurable and predictable. You could draw a graph with the curve heading toward the floor and make a serious plan of running your book into the ground within a specific number of years, months and weeks.

KickstarterWatch: Crowdsourcing is the new patron of the arts.

The money frees Walsh to work on the pages of the online comic, which he said will take him a couple of more months to finish. “Go Home Paddy” follows Paddy Brennan, an Irishman drawn to resemble 19th century caricatures of the Irish, who arrives in Boston in 1847, at the height of the Irish Potato Famine.

“It’s already written,” he said. “But it’s time-consuming. After you’ve written it, you still have to draw it.”

Fifty-six backers gave Walsh $5,800, where previously he’d have needed to get an advance from a publisher — not very likely after the Great Recession. He said crowdsourcing is evolving into a new business model for writers and artists.

StripWatch: Doonesbury takes on Newt Gingrich, and goes for the Google jugular. A nation is now one search away from  “Kip Carter”…