Garth Ennis Writing Hellman and Rat Pack for Rebellion – and Why Glyn Dillon Drew Steve Dillon’s Tanks in Preacher

Friend-of-Bleeding Cool, Alex Fitch, interviewed Garth Ennis at the Lakes International Comic Festival at Kendle last month, and he recorded it for his Panel Borders podcast on Resonance FM. The interview starts at the forty-five-minute mark.

[audio:https://ia801401.us.archive.org/1/items/panelbordersgenreandinspiration/Panel_Borders_Genre_and_Inspiration.MP3]

Here’s a few highlights worth noting;

Before there was 2000AD, there were Battle and Action comics from IPC, the latter of which was closed down due to content concerns. And with Rebellion buying up the IPC rights alongside 2000AD, they are both back. And Garth Ennis is involved.

At 01:02:45:

With Action I’m doing Hellman, with Battle I’m doing Rat Pack, and yes you absolutely get a kick out of that. It’s not going to come out looking like the old Battle, it’s not going to come out printed on that recycled bog roll with the terrible production values and the awful colour on the newsprint. But, it does harken back to those days. So, that’s going to be a treat, especially because the Hellman story will be drawn by Mike Dory who was the original Hellman artist back in 1976. Keith Burns is going to be drawing my Rat Pack story.

At 01:07:35, talking about Star Wars designer Glyn Dillon actually drawing small bits of his brother, the late Steve Dillon‘s Preacher:

There a scene in Monument Valley when the Saint of Killers takes on a squadron of tanks, and I thought “he (Steve Dillon) hates hardware, he’s going to take a lot of shortcuts here”. In fact what he did was that he subcontracted his brother to draw them. His brother’s perfectly happy to draw hardware, which is why all those tanks look so good”

He also talks about the difference between collaborating with Steve and Darick Robertson and how Steve was meant to draw Hellblazer from the start, on dealing with the sexual proclivities of Bond in Jimmy’s Bastards, and on being a fan of Hawk the Slayer – if there was a chance of doing a comic book sequel, he’d like to do it. Last time I checked, that’s what Rebellion are planning.

And while we’re here that Resonance FM who broadcast Fitch’s work are getting a small financial boost from sales of David Hine and Mark Stafford‘s The Bad, Bad Place from Soaring Penguin on Nov 27th, when they will donate £5 from every copy to help keep the radio station running.

About Rich Johnston

Chief writer and founder of Bleeding Cool. Father of two. Comic book clairvoyant. Political cartoonist.

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