Review: “Feast of Bones” for “Warhammer: Age of Sigmar”

Games Workshop has come out with so many different armies and races of beings for the mythos of their Warhammer multiverse. From elves to Eldar, ghouls to Tyranids, orcs to… well, Orks, there is a glut of races in the overall brand.

So suffice it to say that a lot of the difficulty for Games Workshop’s creative department must logically come from the act of producing new races, such as the Ossiarch Bonereapers. But create them they did, and to the credit of Games Workshop’s creative team, they’re quite awesome.

Review: "Feast of Bones" for "Warhammer: Age of Sigmar"
Source: Games Workshop

The main reason we are discussing the Ossiarch Bonereapers in any capacity today is that we at Bleeding Cool got ahold of the “Feast of Bones” boxed set for Warhammer: Age of Sigmar, and wish to review it for you!

The Box Itself

To begin, the Feast of Bones box looks like this:

Review: "Feast of Bones" for "Warhammer: Age of Sigmar"
Source: Games Workshop

As you can see from the packaging, the box details a battle between the Ossiarchs and the Ogors, in a dispute stemming from the breaking of thee Bone-Tithe, a pact enacted by the Ossiarchs and honored by the Ogors for a long time as an act of self-preservation. The Bone-Tithe basically says this: We won’t kill you, but you must supply us with bones – lots of bones – and document the amount and kinds in preparation for our collection thereof.

Review: "Feast of Bones" for "Warhammer: Age of Sigmar"
Here is the Feast of Bones packaging’s backside. Source: Games Workshop

This happened for some time until the Bone-Tithe was broken. Angered, Vakmortian, Master of the Bone-Tithe and one of the key officers for the Ossiarch Bonereapers, decided to enact their end of the bargain-as-broken.

Ossiarch Bonereapers

The Ossiarch Bonereapers are a risen race of amalgamated bone-constructs, created by Nagash, Supreme Lord of the Undead, mostly to serve under one of his Mortarchs (specifically Katakros, Mortarch of the Necropolis). The warriors in their ranks are infused with multiple souls of the dead, given new purpose as the collective consciousness of a killing machine each.

Review: "Feast of Bones" for "Warhammer: Age of Sigmar"
Source: Games Workshop

The Feast of Bones boxed set comes with ten Mortek Guard (your basic infantry amid the Ossiarchs), three Necropolis Stalkers (elite infantry), two Morghasts (large elite flying infantry), and Vokmortian himself (discussed above, and who is a Wizard and Hero for the Bonereapers).

Ogor Mawtribes

This release also sees a number of re-releases of Ogors, namely within the Mawtribe subclass. The models in this release are mostly things that have come out before, save for the Ogor Tyrant, an individual model that is resilient and versatile in its abilities.

Review: "Feast of Bones" for "Warhammer: Age of Sigmar"
Source: Games Workshop

This release comes also with a unit of six Gluttons, two Leadbelchers (noting that usually these are sold on their own as packs of four), and an Ironblaster, in addition to the aforementioned Tyrant.

How Do They Look?

Shortly after receiving the box, I put together both Vokmortian and the Tyrant.

Review: "Feast of Bones" for "Warhammer: Age of Sigmar"
Source: Games Workshop

I was initially worried about how exactly I’d go about affixing the standard’s heads to the rest of the standard for Vokmortian and also how I’d get the casket to stay on his back, but this turned out easy with a bit of pressure.

Review: "Feast of Bones" for "Warhammer: Age of Sigmar"
Source: Games Workshop

The model came out quite nicely. Vokmortian is only comprised of nine parts (not counting the base), and yet coms out so dynamically! It’s a great-looking piece.

Review: "Feast of Bones" for "Warhammer: Age of Sigmar"
Source: Games Workshop

The Tyrant, despite having more parts to it, felt even easier to put together. This model was quite straightforward and there were no issues getting pieces to fit, save for affixing the legs to the main body. This was mainly because of the areas where the legs are attached to the sprue, so it’s likely less Games Workshop’s fault and more the fault of whomever they have to render the sprues overall.

Review: "Feast of Bones" for "Warhammer: Age of Sigmar"
Source: Games Workshop

Together, the piece is beautifully done. It’s not quite as dynamic as Vokmortian, but it’s still quite a sight to behold.

Other Goodies

The Feast of Bones boxed set comes with a number of other tools to be able to play the scenarios right out of the box. The only things that are missing are terrain, dice, and tape measures (though there are cardboard rulers in the release). Feast of Bones also comes with a book of scenarios, an abridged core rulebook, the necessary Warscrolls for your models, and a number of counters to accompany the scenarios.

Review: "Feast of Bones" for "Warhammer: Age of Sigmar"
Source: Games Workshop

Feast of Bones is on preorder both online and your local game store. As of this article’s publishing, Games Workshop’s website is sold out of the box, so you may have to look elsewhere, but believe me when I say it seems worth the $195 pricetag.