Former Dean Ambrose Says WWE Has Sucked Since 2002

Jon Moxley, the former WWE superstar known as Dean Ambrose, let loose on the latest episode of Talk is Jericho following his debut at All Elite Wrestling’s Double or Nothing PPV last weekend. Moxley revealed his true thoughts on WWE’s creative process, and like a lot of wrestling fans, Moxley believes that things began going downhill after WWE bought WCW, eliminating their competition.

With Double or Nothing in the Books, Can AEW Save Pro Wrestling?
Photo courtesy AEW

From a transcription by 411 Wrestling:

One thing that I want to do: if I have something to prove, it’s that I want to prove that your creative process, the WWE’s creative process, sucks. It does not work. It’s absolutely terrible. I’ve said that to Vince. I’ve said that to Hunter. I’ve said that to Michael Hayes. I can’t even tell you how their system works. It’s some kind of system of meetings that take place in Stamford and there’s a home team and there’s writers and producers and production meetings and nobody knows what’s approved and what’s not and the bureaucratic red tape you have to go through to get anything approved is just…it’s crazy. It doesn’t work. It’s killing the company, I think. I think Vince is the problem. Not so much Vince, but Vince and whatever the structure that he built around himself probably starting in I’d imagine like 2002, after the sale of WCW, and he started building this infrastructure around himself, this team of writers and whatever and producers and however he does it and this is how the WWE is and how the product is and the product sucks. Great talent, amazing talent. None of this is their fault.

The Talk is Jericho episode is a treasure trove of Moxley trash talking his former employer, as he also revealed the details of creative meetings with Vince McMahon which ultimately led to his departure from the company:

So one day I come into TV like normal, at this time I think I’m on Smackdown. I’m a good guy, a babyface. I’m a pretty major good guy on the show, basically the lead good guy on the show at this point. I come in and I get a backstage promo handed to me from a writer. Writer is gonna be a key word in this podcast, you will find…and the word script. I get a script handed to me by a writer. And it’s a backstage promo and it’s me describing the things I did on the way to the arena that day. And I can’t remember exactly what the things were because they were so ridiculous and this isn’t an isolated incident. There’s hundreds of these promos that have happened over the years that they all get lost in the shuffle. But it was three or four things, they were things that a cool person does, that a relatable person does, that a guy you wanna have a beer with does. Not even things a guy you wanna root for does. These are things that an idiot would do. Like things along the lines of driving backwards on the street in a unicycle or sharing a pizza with a homeless man on the street, just weird stuff like that. So I’m like, ‘I’m not saying any of that. Change all of that. Rewrite it just to something normal.’ Go about my business. Writer comes back to me later. Vince redid it, put all that stuff back in. Now I have to go in and talk to Vince. Now Vince has rewritten it himself, now it’s out of the writer’s hands, now I gotta go in and talk to Vince. I’m like, ‘Yo. All this stuff, I can’t say all this stuff. It’s ridiculous.’ And he’s like, ‘Oh! It’s such good shit! This stuff! This is the reason people like you! That’s why they connect to you! You’re different! This is you!’ And I’ve had a million conversations with him that are almost this exact same conversation about similar promos. ‘You know this is you! It’s such good shit! It’s what makes you you!’ And I said, ‘So I’m an idiot?’ And he goes, ‘No! [laughs’ It’s you! You’re different!’ And I don’t know where we landed on that particular promo, but that kind of sums up the battle I’ve been fighting for six years.

You can listen to the episode of Talk is Jericho in full below.

About Jude Terror

A prophecy says that in the comic book industry's darkest days, a hero will come to lead the people through a plague of overpriced floppies, incentive variant covers, #1 issue reboots, and super-mega-crossover events.

Scourge of Rich Johnston, maker of puns, and seeker of the Snyder Cut, Jude Terror, sadly, is not the hero comics needs right now... but he's the one the industry deserves.