Sword Daughter #1 Review: An Atmospheric and Beautiful Start

Sword Daughter #1 Review: An Atmospheric and Beautiful Start

Posted by June 10, 2018 Comment

Sword Daughter #1
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Summary
Writer: Brian Wood, Artist: Mick Chater, Color Artist: Jose Villarrubia, Letters: Nate Piekos of Blambot, Cover by: Greg Smallwood, Publisher: Mike Richardson, Editor: Spencer Cushing, Assistant Editor: Jenny Blenk, Designer: Anita Magana, Digital Art Technician: Josie Christensen, Publishing Company: Dark Horse Comics, Release Date: Out Now, Price: $4.99

Elisabeth is the daughter of Dags. The two live in Norway. Ten years ago, their village was raided and slaughtered by a Viking clan called the Forty Swords. Dags went catatonic for ten years while Elisabeth took care of him. Now, he is awake with a daughter that doesn’t properly know him. He wants revenge, and Elisabeth won’t be left behind.

Sword Daughter #1 cover by Greg Smallwood
Sword Daughter #1 cover by Greg Smallwood

Sword Daughter #1 is a very atmospheric and pleasantly understated opening issue. It is told from the perspective of Elisabeth, and she explains her world to us. That said, the narration is sparse, allowing the art to explain more of the story to the audience.

Elisabeth can’t speak properly though, as she was never taught. Her dialogue bubbles are symbols explaining her sounds to the reader. Her narration is in plain English though, so it’s a bizarre yet charming balance.

Another odd detail is Dags’ decade-long catatonia. The comic struggles to explain and only gets it across in the final few pages. You do eventually learn what happened, but you must work to piece it together.

At its core, it’s a revenge story. This is a good way to start one off. We’ve met the characters and know their motivation.

Sword Daughter #1 art by Mick Chater and Jose Villarrubia
Sword Daughter #1 art by Mick Chater and Jose Villarrubia

Mach Chater’s artwork is brilliant, giving the world vibrant detail without over-designing. The resulting style gives the world a cold and empty feeling to it while making the characters lifelike. It looks fantastic and does wonders for the book. Jose Villarrubia compliments the style by using faded and pale shades to color the world. It adds to that feeling of coldness and makes the world seem even more oppressive.

Sword Daughter #1 is a well-constructed, briskly-paced, and gorgeous first issue to this revenge narrative. The stage is set, the characters are introduced, and the tone is well-established. I look forward to where it can go from here. This book earns a recommendation. Give it a read.

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(Last Updated June 10, 2018 2:42 am )

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About Joshua Davison

Josh is a longtime super hero comic fan and an aspiring comic book and fiction writer himself. He also trades in videogames, Star Wars, and Magic: The Gathering, and he is also a budding film buff. He's always been a huge nerd, and he hopes to contribute something of worth to the wider geek culture conversation. He is also happy to announce that he is the new Reviews Editor for Bleeding Cool. Follow on Twitter @joshdavisonbolt.

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