James Mangold Upgrades Black And White Logan Cut From “Working On It” To “Something We Are Doing”

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Last week, Bleeding Cool reported on James Mangold’s tweets indicating that the director was “working on” a black and white version of Logan to be released when Logan hits home video later this year. We understand that sometimes it can be difficult to understand the complex Hollywood lingo bandied about on entertainment websites, so we should explain that “working on it” is a phrase that Hollywood elites often use to describe something they’re working on. Following up on this exciting news, Mangold appeared on insider gossip blog Deadline to reveal the the status of the black and white cut of Logan has been upgraded from “working on it” to “it is something we are doing,” a phrase which in Hollywood means that it is something that they (Mangold and Fox) are doing.

Mangold elaborated on the plans, saying of the positive response to black and white photographs from the film posted during the buildup to its release:

I think it even surprised everyone to the degree that there is a kind of a running assumption that black and white is a turnoff for most people. It caused such an extreme reaction, and so much appreciation for these pictures, and then people immediately wondering if the film itself was going to be in black and white, and so we are giving it a whirl, and I think the Blu-ray will come out with a pass on it. I think it will be a very handsome black and white version of the picture.

So there you have it, folks. Fox is “giving it a whirl,” an industry term that means they are trying it out, and we can expect the “handsome,” or attractive, black and white version of Logan as a special feature on the DVD. That’s cool and all, but if they really wanted it to feel like a Shane-era Western, they’d release a version in Technicolor.

Logan is in theaters now.

About Jude Terror

A prophecy says that in the comic book industry's darkest days, a hero will come to lead the people through a plague of overpriced floppies, incentive variant covers, #1 issue reboots, and super-mega-crossover events.

Scourge of Rich Johnston, maker of puns, and seeker of the Snyder Cut, Jude Terror, sadly, is not the hero comics needs right now... but he's the one the industry deserves.