A Comic Show – Justice Lex’s Forever Ego

Aaron Haaland of A Comic Shop in Orlando, Florida, writes:

Hey Fandom, it’s Aaron from A Comic Shop with a big stack of New Comics Now! This week made my month, not only were there great books from DC, Marvel, and Image, but I got my Geoff Johns fix!

DC just rocked me 52 ways this morning. Johns was at his best in a way we haven’t seen since Blackest Night (but like pizza and sex, Johns’ worst still isn’t bad). I can’t say enough how much I loved Forever Evil #7 and JL #30 without spoiling it. I squeed throughout. I also enjoyed Futures End #3 (especially the last few pages), Batman Eternal, Superman Doomed, and Sinestro #2. This week had me feeling the DC feels in a way I haven’t in years, maybe it’s how the old school fans felt three years after Crisis on Infinite Earths. And for you old 52 fans, get the Dini Black Cat Zatanna Bloodspell OGN.

Marvel’s Original Sin has all the pieces I need for a summer crossover thanks to Jason Aaron. Those pieces are: a high stakes mystery or intellectual problem, whacky team ups, and status quo challenging violence. I didn’t say changing, I know there’s only the illusion of change. Amazing Spider-Man #2 was fast paced and fun. I loved Otto as Spidey, but Peter cleaning up Otto’s messes has been more interesting than I expected with more of that to come (Black Cat). The Deadpool annual where Wade and Spidey change costumes worked for me, and probably will for most Deadpool fans.

Over at Image we have a new start for Saga, and a non-spoiler time jump. Invincible was a new start with all the element that make up the book’s DNA. Betrayal and graphic violence while somehow seeming fresh and even hopeful is it’s secret sauce. Finally MPH, the new Millar vehicle, simply makes a drug like speed give you super speed, and this adderall addicted fanboy is hooked just with the proof of concept!

About Hannah Means Shannon

Editor-in-Chief at Bleeding Cool. Independent comics scholar and former English Professor. Writing books on magic in the works of Alan Moore and the early works of Neil Gaiman.

twitter   facebook square   globe