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Thread: Man of Steel 2013

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    Default Man of Steel 2013

    ‘Man of Steel’: Zack Snyder says film has ‘date with destiny’
    Quote Originally Posted by Geoff Boucher
    When the Warner Bros. film “Man of Steel” opens one year from today it will be flying in formation with history, which is a source of considerable excitement for director Zack Snyder.

    “The thing that’s really special and hasn’t really been acknowledged is that ‘Man of Steel’ comes out on the 75th anniversary of ‘Action Comics’ No. 1,” the filmmaker said just before a stage appearance at the recent Hero Complex Film Festival. ”That’s the very first appearance of Superman. I haven’t seen people talk about that yet.”

    Well, that diamond anniversary will probably be mentioned a few times by DC Comics and Warner Bros. between now and June 14, 2013, when Snyder’s movie arrives with Henry Cavill (“Immortals,” “The Tudors”) wearing the cape, Amy Adams (“The Fighter,” “Enchanted”) as Lois Lane and Michael Shannon (“Revolutionary Road,” “Boardwalk Empire”) as the ruthless General Zod. The cast also includes Russell Crowe, Diane Lane, Kevin Costner and Laurence Fishburne.

    Of the seven actors just mentioned, the 29-year-old Cavill is the only one without an Oscar or Oscar nomination on his résumé — a hint of the resources going into the project that is now in post-production. The movie is Warner’s bid to reenergize Superman as a feature film property (especially now that Christopher Nolan is in the Batcave packing his boxes) and the studio will begin the public side of that process next month with a panel and footage preview at Comic-Con International in San Diego.

    That footage will show the brawniest of all Superman actors to date (a Snyder priority was matching up his star visually with the way he’s depicted in more contemporary comics) and the first foreign-born Superman (a Brit, he hails from the tiny isle of Jersey off the coast of Normandy, France). Although hasn’t the hero always been the ultimate immigrant?

    In June 1938, the refugee from another planet landed at newsstands that were full of headlines about the mighty Joe Louis knocking out Max Schmeling, the German fighter who many feared would be taking the heavyweight championship home to Adolf Hitler (who was about to start a very different fight in Czechoslovakia). With all the newsprint gray, the bright yellow-and-red cover of the inaugural “Action” issue seized young eyes — as did the blue-and-red figure who looked like a circus strongman or Hercules in long-johns.

    The issue is prized like no other for comic fans; there were 200,000 printed back in 1938 but, by most estimates, fewer than 100 copies are still in existence. An auction gavel came down in December 2011 and one nearly pristine copy was sold for $2.16 million. And what was the newsstand price on that issue when it arrived? Just one thin dime.

    Comics are only made of paper (or, now, pixels) but that collector was investing in the best fossil record of something even more valuable: A perfect idea. That’s what writer Jerry Siegel and artist Joe Shuster may have had on their hands when they came up with a red “S”-symbol and put it over the heart of a man who could leap tall buildings in a single bound.

    The idea ricocheted around the globe. It still does, according to Grant Morrison, the Scottish writer who is working on “Action Comics” these days. ”Our greatest ever idea as a human species, if you ask me,” said Morrison, whom the New York Times recently dubbed the ”vulnerable Virgil in the underworld of geek culture,” of the character.

    There have been more than 900 issues of “Action” published and the hero has been in every one of them (it’s not the only Superman title, either, the series simply called “Superman” surpassed 700 issues last year). But in a big jolt, DC started “Action” (and every other series) with a new No. 1.

    The “new” “Action Comics” No. 1 presented a Morrison tale of a younger Kal-El, who showed up for crime-fighting with the old familiar cape but with work boots and blue jeans. It was still Superman, who remains recognizable even if he never stays the same — like a beach that holds its shape even as the sand is in constant flux. It’s the great genius of Siegel and Shuster, Morrison says, to find a costume that can fit anyone and any story as long “as it looks to the sky.”

    Siegel and Shuster’s creation didn’t get any love when they first shopped the character around as a comic strip — it was too strange and too sci-fi. The first fan may have been Sheldon Mayer who was working for the McClure Syndicate — he recognized the allure of Clark Kent’s secret identity.

    “I was crazy about Superman for the same reason I liked ‘The Scarlet Pimpernel,’ ‘Zorro’ and ‘The Desert Song,’” Mayer said years later. “The mystery man and his alter ego are two distinct characters to be played off against each other. The Scarlet Pimpernel’s alter ego was scared of the sight of blood, a hopeless dandy: no one would have suspected he was a hero. The same goes for Superman.”

    Mayer’s endorsement was part of a series of events that got the strip rescued from the “slush file” and on the cover of a new venture called “Action.”

    That’s all it took and the hero quickly went up, up and away with a syndicated newspaper strip starting in 1939, a radio series in 1940 and a silver-screen serial in 1941.

    Siegel and Shuster, two former classmates from Glenville High School in Cleveland, watched that trajectory with mixed emotions because (like the hero’s parents on Krypton) they knew they weren’t going to be along for this ride.

    In March 1938, Siegel and Shuster cashed a $412 check from Detective Comics Inc., giving up the rights to a hero that is rivaled only by Mickey Mouse when it comes to the world’s most instantly recognizable fictional characters. Shuster died in 1992 at age 78, Siegel died four years later at 81 and, needless to say, they were haunted by that transaction into their twilight years.

    Their heirs continue a long legal quest to be part of Superman’s future but an April appellate ruling appeared to be a setback for their cause and, adding insult to injury, it arrived the same day an auction house sold the original cashed check from 1938 for $160,000.

    Snyder has been too busy building his new Metropolis to dwell too much on this history. That might be wise considering that the most recent Metropolis movie, 2006′s “Superman Returns,” proved how difficult it can be to fly forward while simultaneously looking back.

    “Superman Returns” was director Bryan Singer’s valentine to filmmaker Richard Donner’s version of the hero, which took flight in the 1978 smash. That film mesmerized a young Singer, and his movie was steeped in tie-ins to the past (he used a vintage John Williams score, added a cameo by the late Marlon Brando as Jor-El, etc.). The $250-million movie was remote and tentative — like a museum visitor who heeds the instruction to look but, please, don’t touch.

    In an interview early last year, Snyder made it clear that if he makes mistakes they will be new ones.

    “We’re making a movie that finally goes with the approach that there’s been no other Superman movies,” Snyder said. “If you look at ‘Batman Begins,’ there’s that structure: there’s the canon that we know about and respect, but on the other hand there’s this approach that pre-supposes that there haven’t been any other movies. In every aspect of design and of story, the whole thing is very much from that perspective of ‘Respect the canon but don’t be a slave to the movies.’”

    There’s been so many versions of the hero — Christopher Reeve and George Reeves , the Fleischer cartoons and “Smallville,” Kirk Alyn in serials and Bob Holiday on Broadway, etc. — you wonder if even Superman can carry the weight of all that mythology.

    Seventy-four years ago it was different — it was uncluttered. There was one superhero in the world and, in his first 12-page story, he was stopping the execution of a woman framed for murder (and crashing through the door of the governor’s mansion to do it), cracking the jaw of a wife-beater and gleefully spooking a kidnapper with a rooftop view of the city (which was Gotham before there was a Gotham).

    In an interview early last year, Snyder made it clear that if he makes mistakes they will be new ones.

    “We’re making a movie that finally goes with the approach that there’s been no other Superman movies,” Snyder said. “If you look at ‘Batman Begins,’ there’s that structure: there’s the canon that we know about and respect, but on the other hand there’s this approach that pre-supposes that there haven’t been any other movies. In every aspect of design and of story, the whole thing is very much from that perspective of ‘Respect the canon but don’t be a slave to the movies.’”

    There’s been so many versions of the hero — Christopher Reeve and George Reeves , the Fleischer cartoons and “Smallville,” Kirk Alyn in serials and Bob Holiday on Broadway, etc. — you wonder if even Superman can carry the weight of all that mythology.

    Seventy-four years ago it was different — it was uncluttered. There was one superhero in the world and, in his first 12-page story, he was stopping the execution of a woman framed for murder (and crashing through the door of the governor’s mansion to do it), cracking the jaw of a wife-beater and gleefully spooking a kidnapper with a rooftop view of the city (which was Gotham before there was a Gotham).
    Hans Zimmer scoring 'Man of Steel' - Nolan's go-to music man back for WB's Superman reboot
    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Sneider
    Hans Zimmer, who worked on all three films in Christopher Nolan's Batman trilogy, is set to reteam with the filmmaker once again, as Warner Bros. and director Zack Snyder have tapped him to score their Superman pic "Man of Steel."

    Legendary Pictures and Atlas Entertainment produced the superhero tentpole with Syncopy, Cruel & Unusual Films and DC Entertainment. Nolan and producing partner Emma Thomas produced the film with Atlas topper Charles Roven and Cruel & Unusual principal Deborah Snyder. Legendary's Thomas Tull exec produced with Lloyd Phillips.

    In addition to "Batman Begins," "The Dark Knight" and this summer's "The Dark Knight Rises," Zimmer worked with Nolan on "Inception," for which he received an Oscar nomination. He has been nominated for nine Oscars and previously won for Disney's "The Lion King."

    John Williams was nominated for an Oscar for creating the iconic theme to Richard Donner's original "Superman" in 1978.

    "Man of Steel" will mark the first Snyder-directed pic on which the helmer hasn't worked with composer Tyler Bates, who scored "Dawn of the Dead," "300," "Watchmen" and "Sucker Punch."

    "Man of Steel," which hits theaters on June 14, 2013, stars Henry Cavill as the titular superhero, while the rest of the cast includes Russell Crowe, Amy Adams, Michael Shannon, Kevin Costner, Diane Lane, Laurence Fishburne, Antje Traue and Christopher Meloni.

    Zimmer is repped by WME.
    'Dark Knight's' Hans Zimmer to Score Superman Reboot 'Man of Steel'
    This will mark the composer's fourth collaboration with producer Christopher Nolan, on the heels of the director's three Batman movies.
    Quote Originally Posted by Borys Kit
    After donning the Bat symbol, composer Hans Zimmer is putting a big "S" on his chest.


    Zimmer's boarding shows just how much influence Nolan has over the project; Snyder has worked with composer Tyler Bates on all of his movies dating back to his feature directorial debut, Dawn of the Dead, and including 300, Watchmen and Sucker Punch.

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    SPOILERS From CBM:
    Quote Originally Posted by WaylonJones
    Earlier this month it was reported that Man Of Steel will be at San Diego Comic Con as well. The insider told me that not only will they be there but also confirmed that a trailer will be shown as well.

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    Zack Snyder’s MAN OF STEEL to Be Post-Converted to 3D; Plus a New Synopsis [Update: Maybe Not]
    In the pantheon of superheroes, Superman is the most recognized and revered character of all time. Clark Kent/Kal-El (Henry Cavill) is a young twenty-something journalist who feels alienated by powers beyond his imagination. Transported years ago to Earth from Krypton, a highly advanced, distant planet, Clark struggles with the ultimate question ‘Why am I here?’ Shaped by the values of his adoptive parents Martha (Diane Lane) and Jonathan Kent (Kevin Costner), Clark discovers having extraordinary abilities means making difficult decisions. When the world is in dire need of stability, an even greater threat emerges. Clark must become a Man of Steel, to protect the people he loves and shine as the world’s beacon of hope – Superman.

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    The MOS suit at Comic Con.


    Last edited by jamish23; 07-20-2012 at 09:04 PM.

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    David Goyer on Man of Steel
    What Christopher Nolan and I have done with Superman is try to bring the same naturalistic approach that we adopted for the Batman trilogy. We always had a naturalistic approach, we want our stories to be rooted in reality, like they could happen in the same world we live in. It’s not that easy with Superman, and actually this doesn’t necessarily mean we will make a dark movie. But working on this reboot we are thinking about what would happen if a story like this one actually happened. How would people react to this? What impact would the presence of Superman in the real world have? What I really like to do is write ‘genre’ stories without a cartoonish element. I did the same with Da Vinci’s Demons, and I’ll do the same with Man of Steel.

    David S. Goyer On MAN OF STEEL

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    Lois and Superman kissing.


    Kryptonian ship in the ice, which may become the Fortress of Solitude.


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    Who thought there was going to be another film after Returns or another actor in the role after Tom Welling and Brandon Routh, you all remember Batman who thought that after George Clooney there was going to be another actor in the role then Christian Bale came along and delivered one of the best superhero portrayals ever, same goes for Spiderman and Hulk guessing nobody thought anyone could replace Edward Norton and Toby Maguire.

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    Man of Steel is getting a 3D-conversion
    Warner Bros. Confirm MAN OF STEEL 3D Conversion!

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    Man Of Steel' Director Teases 'Crazy' Trailer Coming Ahead Of 'The Hobbit'
    Zack Snyder also talks to MTV News about how stars Henry Cavill and Michael Shannon gave his film 'the respect that it deserves.'
    Man Of Steel' Director Teases 'Crazy' Trailer Coming Ahead Of 'The Hobbit'
    Zack Snyder also talks to MTV News about how stars Henry Cavill and Michael Shannon gave his film 'the respect that it deserves.'
    Quote Originally Posted by Kara Warner
    How would you like to see a little more "Man of Steel" before heading to Middle Earth with "The Hobbit" next month? Warner Bros. is adding an extra treat to the highly anticipated release of Peter Jackson's latest film via a brand-new trailer for the Zack Snyder flick, delivered in both 2-D and 3-D.

    "It's fun. I can't wait for 'The Hobbit,' so it will be fun to see our crazy 'Man of Steel' trailer and then enjoy the Hobbit because that's going to be great," Snyder told MTV News. "It just feels like a fun Christmas thing to do, drag the whole family out for that action."

    Snyder is embracing the holiday spirit ahead of schedule, via the fanfare surrounding the recent release of the "Watchmen Collector's Edition" along with the heroic efforts of "Man of Steel" stars Henry Cavill and chief villain Michael Shannon.

    "Shannon is great, he has such great enthusiasm and dedication constantly," Snyder said of the "Take Shelter" actor fully embracing Zod. "You can imagine that you could get actors who go, 'Oh right, it's Zod, it's not 100 percent serious,' or [you can play it] slightly with a wink, there is none of that with him. His effort is to make it realized and to understand this character and what he has to go through, so you have that on one side and you have Henry, who basically is Superman, on the other side and that dynamic."

    Snyder went on to say that he is incredibly thankful that Cavill and Shannon were onboard with the idea of making their iconic comic book characters as real as possible.

    "I was just incredibly fortunate to play with those guys who really were giving all they had to bring a level of commitment to the scenes they have together so that audiences will get an opportunity to really have their heroes taken seriously," he said. "As serious as I was taking it, and I don't mean that from a depressing kind of way but from a, 'This is important and fun and needs to be given the respect that it deserves,' from that perspective it was so exciting to watch them drink the Kool-Aid of that concept and go all the way."

    And in nearing the home stretch in completing the film ahead of its June 14 release, Snyder seems more than content with his post-production progress.

    "I'm super psyched. It's really fun," he said of his continued enthusiasm for "Man of Steel." "I have no superhero fatigue."

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