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Thread: The Vorpal Blade That Killed Robin

  1. #31
    Captain Cool uz000's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blackfist View Post
    Alan Grant penned a legendary series i'll tell ya
    Yes he did. His Batman run with Norm Breyfogle came 58th in cbr's best 100 comic book runs.

    2012 Top 100 Comic Book Runs #60-56 | Comics Should Be Good! @ Comic Book Resources

    Truly great DC comics.
    saidestroyer likes this.

  2. #32
    Bleeding Cool HellBlazerRaiser's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DarthEwok View Post
    If only Morrison spent as much time learning how to be a good writer as he does on constructing these obscure references
    Your cognitive deficiencies don't mean Morrison is a bad writer.

  3. #33
    Dean of Cool University EmperorCheese's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike H. View Post
    Exactly. I didn't know about the sword's history and I could read and follow the story just fine. The enjoyment factor of Grant's writing comes down to the tastes and preferences of each reader. Also, it would only be exclusionary if Morrison never shared where these story elements originally came from and his reasons for why he chose to use them, instead leaving them to just a handful of readers with the same depth and scope of knowledge about the character to find and enjoy. But he does share them, and DC even profited (further) from them when it published the Black Casebook TPB.
    His interview revealed more of the psychological implications of the Wayne legacy that wasn't obvious from a reasonable glance from the actual comic. What this does is heighten the tragedy for Bruce that likely will have gone missed (unless there's more coming in the next issues) if the reader hadn't seen this blurb from Morrison. Explaining his intent afterwards gave insight into what he's done, but again it's after.
    In a serial format it's not exactly ideal, since there's the assumption that the audience will have the inclination or ability to track down his commentary. This is why I've always thought that Morrison reads much better in a trade format. Especially when the collection has all of the research and concepts that might have been missed with a casual eye.

    Again, not liking Morrison as a writer is one thing. Getting upset that he had the unmitigated gall to research Batman's past, use that past to craft his story, then sharing where these particular Easter Eggs can be found and why he chose to include them? This thread just proves once more that comic fans will indeed bitch about absolutely anything.
    I don't see it as bitching.
    To me this just illustrates why Morrison has a solid fan base, cause he is an ambitious writer with an obvious love of the craft.
    But if I'm running a company, I'm faced with the dilemma that while he will bring his fans to the book, they are his fans and may not be in it for the long haul. Which given the nature of the big two, ideally it is more important for their brand to be the star, not the writer. All of the shenanigans that's been happening recently probably stems from that corporately driven mindset.

    For DC the question will be did he build on the existing fanbase for Batman, not whether they appreciate the skills he brought to his books.

    For me, I'm just pissed he killed Damian. (Plus I think it was a hackneyed decision).

  4. #34
    Exceedingly Cool
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    Quote Originally Posted by DarthEwok View Post
    If only Morrison spent as much time learning how to be a good writer as he does on constructing these obscure references
    And yet when Alan Moore does it for his League of Extraordinary Gentlemen book, it's a sign of brilliance, I suppose?

  5. #35
    Bleeding Cool DarthEwok's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jonboy View Post
    And yet when Alan Moore does it for his League of Extraordinary Gentlemen book, it's a sign of brilliance, I suppose?
    Naw I find that tiresome also. And certainly not a trait of good writing


    But Morrison's need to do it does reveal one more way in which he longs to be like his father-figure/idol, Moore

  6. #36
    Captain Cool uz000's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DarthEwok View Post
    Naw I find that tiresome also. And certainly not a trait of good writing


    But Morrison's need to do it does reveal one more way in which he longs to be like his father-figure/idol, Moore
    I love the Easter eggs that Moore and morrison put in their comics. It allows me to enjoy the comics on multiple levels. I would call it a trait of sophisticated writing.

  7. #37
    Bleeding Cool DarthEwok's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by uz000 View Post
    I love the Easter eggs that Moore and morrison put in their comics. It allows me to enjoy the comics on multiple levels. I would call it a trait of sophisticated writing.
    It's window dressing. It's a fancy garnish. It has nothing to do with competently telling a story from start to finish.

    I enjoyed Nemo: Heart of Ice. One of the complaints I heard, which I agree with, is it was a little short on story. Again, like Morrison, if Moore has spent a bit more time on the meat of the narrative, and less time inserting references to wacky stuff that has inspired him, the story might have been better overall

    It's a bit like camera tricks and fancy shots in movies. In Taxi Driver I did not mind them at all - because Scorsese also made sure to provide a meaty and satisfying story

  8. #38
    Captain Cool uz000's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DarthEwok View Post
    It's window dressing. It's a fancy garnish. It has nothing to do with competently telling a story from start to finish.

    I enjoyed Nemo: Heart of Ice. One of the complaints I heard, which I agree with, is it was a little short on story. Again, like Morrison, if Moore has spent a bit more time on the meat of the narrative, and less time inserting references to wacky stuff that has inspired him, the story might have been better overall

    It's a bit like camera tricks and fancy shots in movies. In Taxi Driver I did not mind them at all - because Scorsese also made sure to provide a meaty and satisfying story
    I am not saying it is an alternative to a good story. Easter eggs are additions to a good story. Morrison and Moore have written some good and bad stories. A good story with Easter eggs is a more rewarding read than just a good story.

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Kalicki View Post
    I never finished Jimmy Corrigan. Can't remember why, just didn't catch my fancy I guess. I don't even know where my copy is now to try again.
    Jimmy Corrigan is ... well, go to your nearest McDonalds branch, think of something sad, then weep into your coffee. Leave the thing to cool for a couple of hours, and then take another few painful, soul-destroying hours to drink it all in (the java, your tears) all the while insisting to the long-suffering serving staff that you are a genius. That's more or less the journey Chris Ware seems to be inviting his readers to take with him.

    Just say no. Dismiss his work in the same way you would a homeless guy who'd got his old chap out in the same notional branch of Mcdonalds; yes, it's realistic, but do you want to see it? No, you don't.
    Last edited by Ian Coke; 03-24-2013 at 07:14 PM.

  10. #40
    Captain Cool alekesam's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by EmperorCheese View Post
    To me this just illustrates why Morrison has a solid fan base, cause he is an ambitious writer with an obvious love of the craft. But if I'm running a company, I'm faced with the dilemma that while he will bring his fans to the book, they are his fans and may not be in it for the long haul. Which given the nature of the big two, ideally it is more important for their brand to be the star, not the writer. All of the shenanigans that's been happening recently probably stems from that corporately driven mindset.
    [/SIZE]
    Very true. And just like Marvel in the 90s, DC is going to find that their brand as the star will fall without adequate balance of brand and writer sharing the spotlight. Not surprising really given how hard DC has fought to become the new-old MArvel.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Coke View Post
    Jimmy Corrigan is ... well, go to your nearest McDonalds branch, think of something sad, then weep into your coffee. Leave the thing to cool for a couple of hours, and then take another few painful, soul-destroying hours to drink it all in (the java, your tears) all the while insisting to the long-suffering serving staff that you are a genius. That's more or less the journey Chris Ware seems to be inviting his readers to take with him.

    Just say no. Dismiss his work in the same way you would a homeless guy who'd got his old chap out in the same notional branch of Mcdonalds; yes, it's realistic, but do you want to see it? No, you don't.
    I admit, Jimmy Corrigan can weight on you and at times can be near soul destroying in it's bleakness. But on the other hand, the way the story is told is brilliant. The craft involved, the page design/layout and use of panels (and panel size) to tell the story is breathtaking to behold. To be dismissive of his art purely because of the tone of the story seems somewhat unfair, isn't it?

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