Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 14
Like Tree2Likes

Thread: The Google Doodle Red Riding Hood Comic Book For Christmas

  1. #1
    Administrator
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    19,442

    Default The Google Doodle Red Riding Hood Comic Book For Christmas

    Celebrating Grimm's Fairy Tales, today's Google Doodle is a twenty-odd "mini-page" comic book telling the story of Red Riding Hood.

    Here it is in full. I think it's rather lovely.


  2. #2
    Very Cool
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    24

    Default

    Uh. Isn't it called "Red Riding Hood", not "Red Robin Hood"?

  3. #3
    Captain Cool uz000's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    3,377

    Default

    That is cool. For another very different take on Red Riding Hood see this music video:

    The Real Tuesday Weld - Me & Mr. Wolf (Official Music Video) - YouTube

  4. #4
    Dean of Cool University Mart's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Edinburgh
    Posts
    1,779

    Default

    It is good stuff, do we know the artist? Have there been any other extended doodles, bar this and Little Nemo?

  5. #5
    Zen Master of Cool Adam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    821

    Default

    I think it's rather lovely.
    It's a little more so on Google's website, if you can still catch it, since the panels scroll horizontally and thus Red Riding Hood appears to walk from one scene into another, but yeah, 'tis very pretty.

  6. #6
    Consultant of Cool MattMoylan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    342

    Default

    I think that, using Scott McCloud's definition, this wouldn't qualify as 'comics' since the images are not juxtaposed. They occupy the same space, just like animation.

    *feeling snooty*

  7. #7
    Captain Cool Fysh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Nodnol
    Posts
    4,490

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MattMoylan View Post
    I think that, using Scott McCloud's definition, this wouldn't qualify as 'comics' since the images are not juxtaposed. They occupy the same space, just like animation.

    *feeling snooty*
    I don't know about that. It's sequential artwork with the reader in control of the rate of change of panels; there's no voice over or moving parts of any individual image, and it's merely the viewing interface they've contrived that places the images into the same place.

    Looks like comics to me, especially when laid out as above by Rich...

  8. #8
    Consultant of Cool MattMoylan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    342

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Fysh View Post
    I don't know about that. It's sequential artwork with the reader in control of the rate of change of panels; there's no voice over or moving parts of any individual image, and it's merely the viewing interface they've contrived that places the images into the same place.

    Looks like comics to me, especially when laid out as above by Rich...
    I think 'juxtaposed' is really an important part of the definition. The Red Riding hood story is essentially textless children's picture book, which wouldn't count as a comic either.

    How Rich laid it out above, yes that'd be a comic. But it's not laid out that way.

  9. #9
    Bleeding Cool Matt Spatola's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Mount Joy, PA
    Posts
    8,473

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MattMoylan View Post
    I think 'juxtaposed' is really an important part of the definition. The Red Riding hood story is essentially textless children's picture book, which wouldn't count as a comic either.

    How Rich laid it out above, yes that'd be a comic. But it's not laid out that way.
    Not sure that really matters. It's just cool.

  10. #10
    Captain Cool Fysh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Nodnol
    Posts
    4,490

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MattMoylan View Post
    I think 'juxtaposed' is really an important part of the definition. The Red Riding hood story is essentially textless children's picture book, which wouldn't count as a comic either.

    How Rich laid it out above, yes that'd be a comic. But it's not laid out that way.
    Is it sequential art, conveying a narrative through the sequence of images with the reader in control of the rate of progression of images? If yes, then in my book it's a comic.

    I don't recall McCloud saying that an individual page must have more than one panel to count as comics. I reject out of hand any notion that text or dialogue is a required part of a comic, not least because by that definition magnificent works like Mister Amperduke would somehow not be considered "comics", and that is a loss for the medium.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •