Mark Millar Responds To Jim Carrey’s Kick-Ass 2 Sandy Hook Comments


Jim Carrey today declared publicly on Twitter that he’s had a change of heart about Kick-Ass 2, in which he has a key role as Colonel Stars and Stripes. Having reflected on the recent mass killing in Sandy Hook, Carrey said that he can no longer support “the level of violence” in the movie.

At some point this evening, Kick-Ass creator Mark Millar promised that he was writing a response to Carrey’s comments. Rather than just throw something out there, though, Millar gave it some time.

So, some hours after he set about writing it, Millar published his response on his Millarworld forums.

First of all, let me say that I think Millar misses a key part of Carrey’s comments. Carrey talked explicitly about how the tragic events of Sandy Hook changed his outlook on the film after he’d already wrapped, but Millar says:

As you may know, Jim is a passionate advocate of gun-control and I respect both his politics and his opinion, but I’m baffled by this sudden announcement as nothing seen in this picture wasn’t in the screenplay eighteen months ago.

No need to be baffled, Carrey made the catalyst for his change of heart clear. And called it a change of heart at that.

Millar makes a lot of good points, though. Here he is arguing the moral relevance of the film to Carrey’s own anti-gun stance.

This is fiction and like Tarantino and Peckenpah, Scorcese and Eastwood, John Boorman, Oliver Stone and Chan-Wook Park, Kick-Ass avoids the usual bloodless body-count of most big summer pictures and focuses instead of the CONSEQUENCES of violence, whether it’s the ramifications for friends and family or, as we saw in the first movie, Kick-Ass spending six months in hospital after his first street altercation. Ironically, Jim’s character in Kick-Ass 2 is a Born-Again Christian and the big deal we made of the fact that he refuses to fire a gun is something he told us attracted him to the role in the first place.

Though, I suppose some might argue that position is undermined by comments like –

Our audience is smart enough to know they’re all pretending and we should instead just sit back and enjoy the serotonin release of seeing bad guys meeting bad ends as much as we enjoyed seeing the Death Star exploding.

– but until I’ve seen the movie, I’m not convinced that the filmmakers can’t somehow weave both effects together.

Once again, a reminder that you can read all of Millar’s response on his Millarworld forums.

It was rather unexpected when this debate kicked off tonight, and in such a public arena too, but this definitely a discussion worth having.

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