The Last Thing Professor X Hears On The Day He Dies

Wes Lowery writes for Bleeding Cool from NYCC;

Comic legend Neal Adams gave more details about his upcoming X-men project, titled “The First X-Men,’ during Thursday’s Neal Adams panel at the 2012 New York Comic Con. Adams, an artist who saved the original X-Men title from the precipice of cancellation, and joked that it was his hobby to save books from such a fate, will be using the new story as a way to fill in the gaps in the X-Men’s early continuity.

“All these pieces need to be filled in,” Adams said, referring to the existence of mutants and a mutant team before the first page of the first X-Men comics.

At the panel, Adams said that he was currently working on the fifth issue of the new series, and that he was finally being allowed to give away certain story details.

He said that the series will see Wolverine and Sabertooth saving a group of young mutants who were being made into lab rats for the Military Industrial Complex.

“Logan’s going to go out and he’s going to help these kids,” Adams said.

Wolverine then approaches a teenaged Professor X to help, arguing that if he turns his back on these kids, that the last thing he hears on the day he dies will be a mutant screaming.

Adams said that Professor X will then assert again that he is not a mutant, only for Wolverine to reveal that his last sentence was not spoken aloud, a sly way of calling him out on being a telepath.

Adams also took time to reminisce about his time in the industry, beginning with a story about Joe Simon, co-creator of Captain America. Adams said that early in his career, Simon turned him down for a job as a favor, because he felt the industry wouldn’t last.

Later in Adams’ career, when he had risen to prominence, Simon approached for help as to compensation for the rights to the character of Captain America, and Adams had the opportunity to remind Simon that he had once told him not to continue in the field of comics.

Representing the other end of the spectrum of Neil’s time in comics was his son, Josh Adams who had recently completed a children’s book with professional wrestler Mick Foley. The story, “The Most Miserable Christmas,” is 46 pages of water-colored art work. Both father and son agree that it was Josh Adam’s best body of work to date.

“It came out two weeks ago, and it’s probably my favorite thing I’ve ever done,” Josh Adams said.

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